HOUSE COMMITTEE APPROVES ABORTION BILLS
by Bruce Schreiner (Associated Press Writer)
SPEAKING AGAINST ABORTION  - February 26, 1992, The News Enterprise of Elizabethtown, KY  -- Pg. 3A
Eva Marie Stover, International Education Director of Women Exploited by Abortion,  was among abortion opponents who testified before the House Judiciary Committee in Frankfort, Kentucky


Abortion opponents gained a House committee's backing Tuesday for two bills to make abortions less readily available.

The first direct confrontation between pro- and anti-abortion forces in the 1992 General Assembly came in the House Judiciary Committee, which also approved a third bill to regulate abortion clinics. 

Opponents of the bills accused abortion foes of a roundabout attack on legal abortions in Kentucky.  They also said abortion opponents were trying to impose their religious beliefs on others.

Abortion foes said the bills would protect women from insensitive and deceptive treatment at abortion clinics.

Attracting the most debate were bills to require informed consent from women seeking abortions and parental consent for minors wanting abortions.

Ted Amshoff Jr., an attorney for Kentucky Right to Life Inc., said the informed consent proposal is needed because most abortions are performed "in a clinic setting ... where you see abortion on the assembly line."

Eva Marie Stover,  an Elizabethtown mother of five who underwent an abortion 22 years ago, said abortion clinics aren't truthful with patients, resulting in  "a world full of physically and psychologically sick women."

An opponent said the bills were motivated by religious doctrine.  "The constitution guarantees that no law shall be used to establish religion.  These proposed laws are nothing more than just that -- the establishment of religion, said the Rev. Gilbert Schroerlucke, a 45-year Methodist minister from Louisville.

Under the bill, a woman must be given information at least 24 hours before the abortion that includes the medical risks, probable gestation age of the fetus and the name of the physician performing the abortion.  The woman also would review material including photographs of unborn children.

Doctors could be sentenced to a year in jail for a violation, though there would be no penalty against the woman.

Rep. Herbie Deskins, D-Pikeville, said the 24-hour requirement would set a double standard by denying abortion rights to rural women who must travel long distances to abortion clinics. Affluent women in urban areas would still have easy access to such clinics, he said.

Another bill would require a minor to obtain consent from a parent or legal guardian before receiving an abortion.  The girl could receive court permission if her safety is jeopardized by going to her parents or guardian.

The bill's supporters said parents should be involved in such a momentous decision.  Opponents countered that the bill doesn't reflect reality when a girl comes from an unstable family.

In promoting the bill to regulate abortion clinics, supporters cited a facility in Jefferson County that state regulators found to be unsanitary.

But their detractors said the regulations were too stringent and were intended to limit the availability of abortions.
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VICTIMS OF ABORTION SPEAK OUT
THE VOICE OF EXPERIENCE
"THERE IS NO SIN SO GREAT THAT GOD CANNOT FORGIVE NOR
WOUND SO DEEP THAT HIS LOVE CANNOT HEAL"
"And GOD shall wipe away all tears from their eyes:  and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither
shall there be any more pain:  For the former things are passed away" 
- Revelation 21:4